Blue Marble Aer

The Blue Marble Aer

Blue Marble Labs came to the Emily Carr Programming, Media, and Prototyping (PMP) lab to develop a wearable which would harmonize personal and environmental health.

The Blue Marble Aer The Blue Marble Aer Cord / charging Cord / charging

Process

Faculty advisor Keith Doyle gave Ryan White and myself the chance to tackle the project. The process began by fleshing out some aspirational personas and accompanying mood boards, seen below, to help define our user.

PERSONA

After getting an idea of what we were looking for I jumped into sketching some initial form exploration.

Sketches Sketches

I explored additional concepts and materials in depth via CAD to try and get a sense of where to start refining.

CAD Sketches

This project had a large budget for prototyping and this allowed me to iterate prolifically between CAD and rapid prototyping with FDM and SLA 3D printing techniques. Going between CAD and physical models lent invaluable experience in the subtle differences between visualizations and real life, informing the design immensely.

CAD Sketches

We began to look at attachment mechanisms, and I continued to iterate on a concept which used a central band to hold the device in place.

CAD Sketches Sketches CAD Sketches

During These explorations we hit on the circular form with a band around a groove in the center part line to secure the device to a number of attachment mechanisms. I jumped back to sketching to refine the concept further.

Sketches

These sketches informed our form development and I hopped back into cad, with bit of 1 to 1 rapid prototyping each time we hit a significant milestone in the design.

CAD Sketches

These sketches informed our form development and I hopped back into cad, with bit of 1 to 1 rapid prototyping each time we hit a significant milestone in the design.

Where I got before change (2 -3)

As we were nearing the end of the project there was a change in spec it turns out the sensors we were using required direct air contact and the PCB had increased in size dramatically; the avenue I had been pursuing was no longer viable. Fortunately I had the pleasure of working with a talented designer, Ryan White, and he had been working on a design which satisfied these new requirements.

Working together, and with a heroic number of solidworks rebuilds from Ryan we were able to quickly pivot and combine elements from both of our avenues of inquiry into a final model and meet the deadline.

sketches of base / waves

Blue Marble Labs entered us in Vancouver's "Why I Design" competition and we were given the chance to exhibit our work in the Museum of Vancouver. In the center is fantastic teammate Ryan White (second from right), the Blue Marble team, and myself just before the show. Bottom right is our fearless fauculty leader Keith Doyle (on the left) and perennially patient shepherd of the PMP lab Philip Robbins (on the right)

BML at the Museum of Vancouver

After the project was over I went back in for a final revision, taking what I had learned and tweaking what I had done previously; I began with the base, taking what we had for the final and rebuilding it.

Base Iterations

I also wanted to crystalize how the interchangable bases worked with the stand. I rebuilt the base and its means of connection to the stand so that both could be manufactured easily and manipulated intuitively.

Base and stand / cord wrapping

Thank you for your time.